Actions Verbs for Medical Professionals

Like other career fields, medical professionals use many of the standard action verbs found across other job titles and industries.

Some of the most common are managed, formalized, directed, streamlined, and so on.

When it comes to medical professionals, however, such as nurses, doctors, and so on, several other action verbs could be used to represent the caring, emphatic, resourceful, and compassionate nurse of those within the medical profession.

For example, here are 30+ action verbs that medical professionals could use. Should you need the more traditional list of action verbs, be sure to check out this list of 300+ general action verbs.


Admitted
Advanced
Advocated
Aided
Assigned
Assessed
Assisted
Cared
Charted
Charged
Consoled
Counseled
Diagnosed
Distributed
Documented
Educated
Evaluated
Guided
Helped
Influenced
Qualified
Listened
Monitored
Nursed
Practiced
Prevented
Proceeded
Provided
Referred
Regulated
Repaired
Reset
Resourced
Restricted
Reviewed
Secured
Supported
Sutured
Trained
Volunteered


Before/After Resume Example for 2013

What’s all the fuss about resumes these days?

No doubt, resumes have changed dramatically, just over the last 5 years alone.

So, why all the improvements to something so seemingly simple in purpose?

Here are a few examples of what’s changed:

First, talent management systems (TMS) have entered the hiring process.

Think of TMSs as nothing more than a search engine within the hiring world. TMSs aren’t necessarily a new technology for hiring managers and recruiters. In fact, it’s been said that many of the modern-day systems were based off of USAJobs.gov’s old platform, the Resumix. Yeah! There’s a blast from the past for many of us.


What you need to know now is that resumes (candidates) are being searched for using a string of boolean search keywords. To learn more about how these strings work, simply visit “How to Remedy These 6 Resume Blemishes” and skip down to #6 on the list.

Second, graphic design is creeping into resumes – thank GOD!
Take a look at this before and after resume example. The top resume was created in 2007, while the second resume (for the same client) was created in 2012. Huge visual difference, right?

BEFORE

before-resume-example

 

 

 

 

 

AFTER

after-resume-example

 

 

 

 

 

 

Third, one of the other major changes you’ll notice that resumes are now given some SKIM FACTOR. At quick glance, any reader can immediately see what this candidate is targeting as get some brief overview as to what makes this Vice President of Customer Care stand out. Although talent management systems are important to today’s hiring process, there are still people at the helm reviewing resumes so catering to both people and computer systems are important.

Fourth, there is a bit of controversy amongst resume readers as to whether a resume should be heavy, light, or somewhere in the middle. Of course, this goes hand-in-hand with the age-old question of whether a resume should be one page or two. =] Overall, how “meaty” a resume ultimately depends on the depth and broadness of each individual’s career. For example, a new grad’s resume probably wouldn’t look anything like the above resume for a Vice President.


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What are Resume Starter Words?

Starter words are those magical words that “start” each sentence of your resume. So most often, starter words within your resume are action verbs.

Take the following sentences as examples:

* Led the security initiatives and infrastructure projects that supported the daily IT activities for more than 33,000 end-users at 12 national and international offices.


* Manage a team of 8 accounting consultants, which support upwards of 65 client accounts with revenues totaling $1.2 billion.

* Consult with accounting staff on forecasting, collecting, and analyzing long-term financial goals.

Within the above examples, “led,” “manage,” and “consult” are the starter words (yet are also known as action verbs, because each reflects action).

Currently, we have several lists of action verbs available.

You can check out the action verb category, or visit one of the following:

  1. Action Verbs for Teachers
  2. Actions Verbs for Accounting & Financial Professionals
  3. Action Verbs for Sales & Marketing Reps
  4. 300+ General List of Action Verbs — This is a general list that isn’t position or industry specific

  5. The Smart Move You Can Make:
    Use a Professional Writer to Transform Your
    Resume & Cover Letter

    Click Here to Learn Why Resume to
    Referral is One of The Top-Endorsed Resume Writing Firms
    Available to You

75+ Action Verbs for Teachers

When it comes to action verbs for teachers, there are several great options to choose from.

For example, here’s a sizable list of action verbs (what some call power words) to include within your teacher’s resume:

Advised
Aided
Appointed
Arranged
Authored
Authorized
Certified
Chaired
Circulated
Coached
Communicated
Conferred
Consulted
Counseled
Discussed
Edited


Educated
Encouraged
Evaluated
Explained
Facilitated
Fostered
Gathered
Granted
Guided
Helped
Illustrated
Influenced
Informed
Instilled
Instructed
Interpreted
Interviewed
Introduced
Lectured
Led
Mediated
Mentored
Moderated
Motivated
Organized
Oriented
Participated
Performed
Personalized
Persuaded
Planned
Prepared
Presented
Prioritized
Produced
Programmed
Read
Recorded
Referred
Represented
Researched
Reviewed
Scheduled
Set up
Shaped
Spoke
Stimulated
Studied
Summarized
Supervised
Supported
Taught
Tested
Trained
Translated
Tutored
Volunteered
Wrote